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From MedScape:

Primary head injury can be catastrophic, but the effects of repetitive head injuries must also be considered. Second-impact syndrome (SIS), a term coined in 1984, describes the situation in which an individual sustains a second head injury before the symptoms from the first head injury have resolved.
The second injury may occur from days to weeks following the first. Loss of consciousness is not a requirement of this condition, the impact may seem relatively mild, and the athlete may appear only dazed initially. However, this second impact causes cerebral edema and herniation, leading to collapse and death within minutes. Only 17 cases of confirmed SIS have been reported in the medical literature. Thus, the true risk and pathophysiology of SIS has not been clearly established.
Importantly, even if the effects of the initial brain injury have already resolved (6-18 mo post injury), the effect of multiple concussions over time remains significant and can result in long-term neurologic and functional deficits. These multiple brain insults can still be termed repetitive head injury syndrome, but they do not fit the classification of SIS. True SIS would most likely have a devastating outcome.
A study of American high school and college football players demonstrated 94 catastrophic head injuries (significant intracranial bleeding or edema) over a 13-year period Of these, only 2 occurred at the college level. Seventy-one percent of high school players suffering such injuries had a previous concussion in the same season, with 39% playing with residual symptoms. On the other hand, results from a study of concussion by the National Football League demonstrated no cases of SIS or catastrophic head injury in players returning to play in the same game after resolution of symptoms.
Numerous studies of professional boxers have shown that repeated brain injury can lead to chronic encephalopathy, termed dementia pugilistica.  Likewise, the autopsies of 2 former professional football players with a history multiple concussions demonstrated changes that were consistent with chronic encephalopathy.
Another investigation of retired professional football players showed a 3-fold increase of depression in players with a history of 3 or more concussions. Older studies of American and Australian rules football showed no effect from repetitive mild head injuries. However, more recent studies of collegiate football players showed an association between multiple concussions and reduced cognitive performance, prolonged recovery, and the increased likelihood of subsequent concussions.

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