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A hug is duct tape for the soul.

 
The current issue of Good Housekeeping has an interview with Michael J. Fox, who announced publicly in 1998 that he has Parkinson's Disease. Since that time, the Michael J. Fox Foundation has funded more than $238 million in research, either directly or through partnerships. The foundation "is dedicated to finding a cure for Parkinson’s disease through an aggressively funded research agenda and to ensuring the development of improved therapies for those living with Parkinson’s today."

Here's an excerpt from the interview, prompted by Fox's approaching 50th birthday:

RE: Right. Which is something you must have thought about a lot when you were first diagnosed. Things like that — big life-changers and significant birthdays — make you reconsider what you value.

MJF: You know, there's a rule in acting called "Don't play the result." If you have a character who's going to end up in a certain place, don't play that until you get there. Play each scene and each beat as it comes. And that's what you do in your life: You don't play the result.

So you get diagnosed with Parkinson's, and you can play the result. You can go right to, "Oh, I'm sick." It took me seven years to figure out that I'm not at the result. I'm not at the result till the end. So let's not play it. It's not written yet. And so that's the attitude I take in life. Another expression is "Act as if." Act as if it's the way you want it to be, and it'll eventually morph into that.

RE: That's a very wise attitude.

MJF: Well, with Parkinson's, it's like you're in the middle of the street and you're stuck there in cement shoes and you know a bus is coming at you, but you don't know when. You think you can hear it rumbling, but you have a lot of time to think. And so you just don't live that moment of the bus hitting you until it happens. There's all kinds of room in that space.

RE: What's the hardest part about Parkinson's?

MJF: I actually never talk about this, but the hardest thing is probably the fatigue. And trying to have a higher threshold for it. Sometimes there may be things I want to do, and I say, "I'm so freakin' tired. I don't know if I can do it." And then I'll do it and I'll never regret that I did it. But [the hardest part is] just getting over that.
Read the complete interview here.

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Comments:
Happy birthday Michael j fox!!!
I'm your BIGGEST FAN EVER!
 
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